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Oh, no! Web 2.0

Always wanting to be at least semi-aware of what's coming down the pike in technology, I was drawn to TechSoup's "event" this week (a hosted forum discussion with special guests) promising to "demystify Web 2.0 technologies and illustrate how using new socially oriented technological innovations can help the nonprofit community."

First off, I'm so semi-unaware lately that I thought they were going to be addressing Internet 2. Just as well I was wrong.

To wiki or not to wiki? To start syndication really simply? To tag, make social bookmarks, et cetera... these are the questions.

Nothing "new," really. Just the current wave of actualized concepts being ridden by the tech-savvy (and some not-so-savvy) into the inevitable evolution of the web.

So I got thinking about my own foundering blog, static websites, aborted forays into 2.0 technologies. It's easy to get excited about the potential of these new technologies, but it's another to commit to learning, developing, and introducing them to audiences not ready to embrace them.

Despite my pessimism, I spent an afternoon reviewing free open source content management systems. I found the CMS Matrix to be quite useful, allowing me to compare features among dozens of systems (in a broad sense). (I picked Drupal, Joomla!, Etomite, Serendipity, WordPress, GuppY, Nucleus, and PHP-Nuke.) The nifty try-before-you-install interface at OpenSourceCMS helped me to narrow my scope for populating the matrix.

Of course, nothing is a perfect fit. So I'll adopt something to try it out and hope the shoehorn doesn't break, hope the limitations are surmountable, hope I don't spend more time figuring out the system than using it, and so on.

Will it be bye-bye Blogger, hello WordPress? Welcome to Joomla!? Sink or swim with GuppY? Hope for Serendipity?

Time will tell, 2.0.

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